Vintage Toys in Japan
Practice Bakes Perfect Challenge #25

Add Comment

Comments (13)

Newest · Oldest · Popular

It is much longer than I expected for me to figure out what are vintage in Japan.  I went to museum and interviewed 70s and 80s years-old people what they had when they were children.  But I found out what I believed vintage were actually “antique” or “retro”.

 Vintage is roughly 50 to 100 years ago from now. 100 years ago Japanese people wore Kimono (traditional cloth) everyday, children went to school in Kimono and people worked in Kimono.  60 years ago washing machines were too expensive and clothes were washed still by hand at home. Those are hard to imagine considering current Japanese in comfortable clothes and nowadays Japan with technologies.  People whom I interviewed said, “we were poor because of war, we did not have anything”.  No fancy things, people still wore kimono…..  This Challenge seemed dead end to me. 

 Even we were poor, we should have some materials such as bamboo, paper, old kimono and wood.  Actually there were toys made with those materials. Followings were played by children during vintage period, 50 to 100 years ago.

 Bamboo toys:  Kendama of which oldest record in Japan is 1809, and the shape of it was slightly different.  In 1918 Japanese Kendama was made and the form of it was as same as the ones we see now. 

kendama

Taketonbo:  helicopter-like bamboo toy  If you know Manga called Draemon, Draemon wears Takecopter cap to fly.   This is how we play :  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddkfl6XR5s8&t=39s  It is said that the history goes back to more than 1000 years ago but since they were made of wood, it is hard to find the actual oldest Taketonbo.  When I was a child, I also played Taketonbo.   How I did with my cookie is I shaped rectangular cookie with sandpaper to make the wing.   it looks so simple but it took hours.  I attached a bamboo skewer.  

tonbo

 Toy made with old kimono cloth:  Otedama (they look like juggling but we play differently)  Beans were put inside of them and saved for emergency food. 

otedama

 

Paper balloon:  they were so precious for children since they were broken easily.  Children folded paper balloon flat and kept it in their treasure box, I did, too.  I tried to express the wrinkles and folded lines of paper. 

kamifusen

 Kewpie doll:  Original Kewpie was born in the States in 1909.  In 1912 Kewpie dolls were made in Germany but the factory was closed then they were started to be made in Japan.  However, the quality was really bad and celluloid material was not suitable to American market.  The dolls were not accepted.  Kewpie doll made in Japan started making its own way in Japan.  Main mayonnaise company in Japan is Kewpie Mayonnaise and they registered Kewpie as their trademark.  It is considered that its copy right is already expired.  I think since Kewpie dolls were rejected by US, lots of dolls were sold in Japan and they became easily popular when we did not have cute things to play with.  Children made kimono and easy clothes for Kewpie and played as a dress-up doll.  

QP

 Black and brown powder were put on those cookies to make them look “vintage”

Attachments

Photos (5)
swissophie posted:

Another great set! Love that doll ❤️❤️❤️! Fabulous job on those eyes!

Hi Sonja, this is the first time for me to make a doll with cookie and white eyes without colors made me really worried whether I could make them cute because they looked so scary.   My Kewpie doll became very cute!  and I am showing it off to my friends. 

Ryoko ~Cookie Ave. posted:

It is much longer than I expected for me to figure out what are vintage in Japan.  I went to museum and interviewed 70s and 80s years-old people what they had when they were children.  But I found out what I believed vintage were actually “antique” or “retro”.

 Vintage is roughly 50 to 100 years ago from now. 100 years ago Japanese people wore Kimono (traditional cloth) everyday, children went to school in Kimono and people worked in Kimono.  60 years ago washing machines were too expensive and clothes were washed still by hand at home. Those are hard to imagine considering current Japanese in comfortable clothes and nowadays Japan with technologies.  People whom I interviewed said, “we were poor because of war, we did not have anything”.  No fancy things, people still wore kimono…..  This Challenge seemed dead end to me. 

 Even we were poor, we should have some materials such as bamboo, paper, old kimono and wood.  Actually there were toys made with those materials. Followings are played by children during vintage period, 50 to 100 years ago.

 Bamboo toys:  Kendama of which oldest record in Japan is 1809, and the shape of it was slightly different.  In 1918 Japanese Kendama was made and the shape of it is as same as the ones we see now. 

kendama

Taketonbo:  helicopter-like bamboo toy  If you know Manga called Draemon, Draemon wears Takecopter cap to fly.   This is how we play :  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddkfl6XR5s8&t=39s  It is said that the history goes back to more than 1000 years ago but since they were made of wood, it is hard to find the actual oldest Taketonbo.  When I was a child, I also played Taketonbo.   How I did with my cookie is I shaped rectangular cookie with sandpaper to make the wing.   it looks so simple but it took hours.  I attached a bamboo skewer.  

tonbo

 Toy made with old kimono cloth:  Otedama (they look like juggling but we play differently)  Beans were put inside of them and saved for emergency food. 

otedama

 

Paper balloon:  they were so precious for children since they were broken easily.  Children folded paper balloon flat and kept it in their treasure box, I did, too.  I tried to express the wrinkles and folded lines of paper. 

kamifusen

 Kewpie doll:  Original Kewpie was born in the States in 1909.  In 1912 Kewpie dolls were made in Germany but the factory was closed then they were started to be made in Japan.  However, the quality was really bad and celluloid material was not suitable to American market.  The dolls were not accepted.  Kewpie doll made in Japan started making its own way in Japan.  Main mayonnaise company in Japan is Kewpie Mayonnaise and they registered Kewpie as their trademark.  It is considered that its copy right is already expired.  I think since Kewpie dolls were rejected by US, lots of dolls were sold in Japan and they became easily popular when we did not have cute things to play with.  Children made kimono and easy clothes for Kewpie and played as a dress-up doll.  

QP

 Black and brown powder were put on those cookies to make them look “vintage”

The explanations that you write for your entires are always so informative! I learn something new from you with every entry you submit, Ryoko!  Also, I love how you did first-person research for this challenge, interviewing older people to find out what life was like many decades ago. 

All that said, the actual cookies that you made are fabulous.  I love how you used dusts to antique them, and all of the careful details that you added - like the crumpled paper of the balloon.  I absolutely believe that the filing of the cookie for the Taketonbo took hours! Filing cookies is one of my very least favorite cookie tasks to do. This is a terrific addition to the challenge!

Bakerloo Station posted:
Ryoko ~Cookie Ave. posted:

It is much longer than I expected for me to figure out what are vintage in Japan.  I went to museum and interviewed 70s and 80s years-old people what they had when they were children.  But I found out what I believed vintage were actually “antique” or “retro”.

 Vintage is roughly 50 to 100 years ago from now. 100 years ago Japanese people wore Kimono (traditional cloth) everyday, children went to school in Kimono and people worked in Kimono.  60 years ago washing machines were too expensive and clothes were washed still by hand at home. Those are hard to imagine considering current Japanese in comfortable clothes and nowadays Japan with technologies.  People whom I interviewed said, “we were poor because of war, we did not have anything”.  No fancy things, people still wore kimono…..  This Challenge seemed dead end to me. 

 Even we were poor, we should have some materials such as bamboo, paper, old kimono and wood.  Actually there were toys made with those materials. Followings are played by children during vintage period, 50 to 100 years ago.

 Bamboo toys:  Kendama of which oldest record in Japan is 1809, and the shape of it was slightly different.  In 1918 Japanese Kendama was made and the shape of it is as same as the ones we see now. 

kendama

Taketonbo:  helicopter-like bamboo toy  If you know Manga called Draemon, Draemon wears Takecopter cap to fly.   This is how we play :  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddkfl6XR5s8&t=39s  It is said that the history goes back to more than 1000 years ago but since they were made of wood, it is hard to find the actual oldest Taketonbo.  When I was a child, I also played Taketonbo.   How I did with my cookie is I shaped rectangular cookie with sandpaper to make the wing.   it looks so simple but it took hours.  I attached a bamboo skewer.  

tonbo

 Toy made with old kimono cloth:  Otedama (they look like juggling but we play differently)  Beans were put inside of them and saved for emergency food. 

otedama

 

Paper balloon:  they were so precious for children since they were broken easily.  Children folded paper balloon flat and kept it in their treasure box, I did, too.  I tried to express the wrinkles and folded lines of paper. 

kamifusen

 Kewpie doll:  Original Kewpie was born in the States in 1909.  In 1912 Kewpie dolls were made in Germany but the factory was closed then they were started to be made in Japan.  However, the quality was really bad and celluloid material was not suitable to American market.  The dolls were not accepted.  Kewpie doll made in Japan started making its own way in Japan.  Main mayonnaise company in Japan is Kewpie Mayonnaise and they registered Kewpie as their trademark.  It is considered that its copy right is already expired.  I think since Kewpie dolls were rejected by US, lots of dolls were sold in Japan and they became easily popular when we did not have cute things to play with.  Children made kimono and easy clothes for Kewpie and played as a dress-up doll.  

QP

 Black and brown powder were put on those cookies to make them look “vintage”

The explanations that you write for your entires are always so informative! I learn something new from you with every entry you submit, Ryoko!  Also, I love how you did first-person research for this challenge, interviewing older people to find out what life was like many decades ago. 

All that said, the actual cookies that you made are fabulous.  I love how you used dusts to antique them, and all of the careful details that you added - like the crumpled paper of the balloon.  I absolutely believe that the filing of the cookie for the Taketonbo took hours! Filing cookies is one of my very least favorite cookie tasks to do. This is a terrific addition to the challenge!

Bakerloo Station posted:
Ryoko ~Cookie Ave. posted:

It is much longer than I expected for me to figure out what are vintage in Japan.  I went to museum and interviewed 70s and 80s years-old people what they had when they were children.  But I found out what I believed vintage were actually “antique” or “retro”.

 Vintage is roughly 50 to 100 years ago from now. 100 years ago Japanese people wore Kimono (traditional cloth) everyday, children went to school in Kimono and people worked in Kimono.  60 years ago washing machines were too expensive and clothes were washed still by hand at home. Those are hard to imagine considering current Japanese in comfortable clothes and nowadays Japan with technologies.  People whom I interviewed said, “we were poor because of war, we did not have anything”.  No fancy things, people still wore kimono…..  This Challenge seemed dead end to me. 

 Even we were poor, we should have some materials such as bamboo, paper, old kimono and wood.  Actually there were toys made with those materials. Followings are played by children during vintage period, 50 to 100 years ago.

 Bamboo toys:  Kendama of which oldest record in Japan is 1809, and the shape of it was slightly different.  In 1918 Japanese Kendama was made and the shape of it is as same as the ones we see now. 

kendama

Taketonbo:  helicopter-like bamboo toy  If you know Manga called Draemon, Draemon wears Takecopter cap to fly.   This is how we play :  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddkfl6XR5s8&t=39s  It is said that the history goes back to more than 1000 years ago but since they were made of wood, it is hard to find the actual oldest Taketonbo.  When I was a child, I also played Taketonbo.   How I did with my cookie is I shaped rectangular cookie with sandpaper to make the wing.   it looks so simple but it took hours.  I attached a bamboo skewer.  

tonbo

 Toy made with old kimono cloth:  Otedama (they look like juggling but we play differently)  Beans were put inside of them and saved for emergency food. 

otedama

 

Paper balloon:  they were so precious for children since they were broken easily.  Children folded paper balloon flat and kept it in their treasure box, I did, too.  I tried to express the wrinkles and folded lines of paper. 

kamifusen

 Kewpie doll:  Original Kewpie was born in the States in 1909.  In 1912 Kewpie dolls were made in Germany but the factory was closed then they were started to be made in Japan.  However, the quality was really bad and celluloid material was not suitable to American market.  The dolls were not accepted.  Kewpie doll made in Japan started making its own way in Japan.  Main mayonnaise company in Japan is Kewpie Mayonnaise and they registered Kewpie as their trademark.  It is considered that its copy right is already expired.  I think since Kewpie dolls were rejected by US, lots of dolls were sold in Japan and they became easily popular when we did not have cute things to play with.  Children made kimono and easy clothes for Kewpie and played as a dress-up doll.  

QP

 Black and brown powder were put on those cookies to make them look “vintage”

The explanations that you write for your entires are always so informative! I learn something new from you with every entry you submit, Ryoko!  Also, I love how you did first-person research for this challenge, interviewing older people to find out what life was like many decades ago. 

All that said, the actual cookies that you made are fabulous.  I love how you used dusts to antique them, and all of the careful details that you added - like the crumpled paper of the balloon.  I absolutely believe that the filing of the cookie for the Taketonbo took hours! Filing cookies is one of my very least favorite cookie tasks to do. This is a terrific addition to the challenge!

Thank you, Christine @Bakerloo Station.   It took very long for me to figure out many things but what you wrote here made me think I really did something worth.   And again through the Challenge, I am learning a lot and I am challenging what I haven't tried. 

To make a Kewpie Doll, since children used to play as a dress-up doll, I made a naked Kewpie doll first then I put on Kimono.   What I heard was that to dress up Kewpie doll with Kimono was not easy because of the shape but I imagined a child dressed it up with her old kimono that she made smaller.  

×
×
×
×