All that Giltters is Gold!

I use lots of different gold products depending on the look I want.

 

For spraying (to get every recess in a cookie or to stencil), I use luster sprays like PME or Pavoni (an Italian brand I recently discovered, which I love because it's super shiny). Of course, airbrush coloring is also possible here, but I am often too lazy to get out my airbrush.

 

For sponging (just getting isolated gold highlights on raised elements) or painting small areas, I like to mix luster or highlighter dust with a little alcohol-based extract and then I either use a sponge brush or small craft paint brush to apply it, depending on the technique. Highlighter dust is MUCH brighter/shinier than luster dust, but it's labeled for "display only" so I don't use it other than on "show" pieces.

 

Then, there are gold Rainbow Dust metallic pens for drawing finer lines . . . Oh yes, and edible gold leaf. I lift small pieces of it from the sheet and stick it onto cookies with a touch of corn syrup. Used it on my decoupaged eggs in a recent video. I'm sure I've just scratched the surface, but these are the ways I most often apply gold.

So far I have tried the following options (as I simply love glitter in all kinds):

 

- ready bought edible paint from Rainbow Dust. It comes in small bottles to be painted on with a brush. Pretty neat results, but kind of expensive, at least in Germany. And... see next point.

 

- Lustre dust from Rainbow Dust, edible silk range. It can be applied dry for a light shimmer. Or mixed with clear alcohol and will then be exactly like the ready bought paint - only a lot cheaper and it is more easy to control the quantity and required thickness. More alcohol = semi-translucent. Less alcohol = high coverage. Love the stuff

 

- Lustre dust from Rainbow Dust, sparkle range. Those have tiny glitter particles included and I find it almost impossible to paint with them. But they work fine if sprinkled over fresh icing, or if an uneven look is required.

 

- Glitter sugar, which is no good to paint with, of course. But it can be sprinkled over fresh icing and also gives a gorgeous effect plus additional structure. You can also make it yourself by adding silever/gold color (either ready bought or self mixed) to fine sugar, just a few drops. There are instructions how to make glitter sugar flying around the net.

 

I haven't tried edible foil yet, nor airbrush, but I guess you can create nice effects with them too. And I would be highly interested in other options to get glitter on cookies as well! Nice topic

Originally Posted by Julia M. Usher:

I use lots of different gold products depending on the look I want.

 

For spraying (to get every recess in a cookie or to stencil), I use luster sprays like PME or Pavoni (an Italian brand I recently discovered, which I love because it's super shiny). Of course, airbrush coloring is also possible here, but I am often too lazy to get out my airbrush.

 

For sponging (just getting isolated gold highlights on raised elements) or painting small areas, I like to mix luster or highlighter dust with a little alcohol-based extract and then I either use a sponge brush or small craft paint brush to apply it, depending on the technique. Highlighter dust is MUCH brighter/shinier than luster dust, but it's labeled for "display only" so I don't use it other than on "show" pieces.

 

Then, there are gold Rainbow Dust metallic pens for drawing finer lines . . . Oh yes, and edible gold leaf. I lift small pieces of it from the sheet and stick it onto cookies with a touch of corn syrup. Used it on my decoupaged eggs in a recent video. I'm sure I've just scratched the surface, but these are the ways I most often apply gold.

Thank for all the great information!  I am going to check out the Rainbow dust products!  As for your airbrush comment, I know what you mean about the effort for pulling it out. I solved that problem.  I use it on the counter by my sink because I like to run a little water through it when I am done.  Well with that said, I just emptied the shelf of the cupboard above the counter where I use it. My air brush is a little heavy so I just keep the compressor in the cupboard even when I am using it. the electrical cord reaches a nearby outlet and the air cord is plenty long enough too! When I use it I just open the cupboard and and plug it in! There it is. Extra bonus is that when I am decorating, because the compressor is on the shelf, it doesn't take up my counter/work space.

Originally Posted by Cookie Me This~ Heidi:
Originally Posted by Julia M. Usher:

I use lots of different gold products depending on the look I want.

 

For spraying (to get every recess in a cookie or to stencil), I use luster sprays like PME or Pavoni (an Italian brand I recently discovered, which I love because it's super shiny). Of course, airbrush coloring is also possible here, but I am often too lazy to get out my airbrush.

 

For sponging (just getting isolated gold highlights on raised elements) or painting small areas, I like to mix luster or highlighter dust with a little alcohol-based extract and then I either use a sponge brush or small craft paint brush to apply it, depending on the technique. Highlighter dust is MUCH brighter/shinier than luster dust, but it's labeled for "display only" so I don't use it other than on "show" pieces.

 

Then, there are gold Rainbow Dust metallic pens for drawing finer lines . . . Oh yes, and edible gold leaf. I lift small pieces of it from the sheet and stick it onto cookies with a touch of corn syrup. Used it on my decoupaged eggs in a recent video. I'm sure I've just scratched the surface, but these are the ways I most often apply gold.

Thank for all the great information!  I am going to check out the Rainbow dust products!  As for your airbrush comment, I know what you mean about the effort for pulling it out. I solved that problem.  I use it on the counter by my sink because I like to run a little water through it when I am done.  Well with that said, I just emptied the shelf of the cupboard above the counter where I use it. My air brush is a little heavy so I just keep the compressor in the cupboard even when I am using it. the electrical cord reaches a nearby outlet and the air cord is plenty long enough too! When I use it I just open the cupboard and and plug it in! There it is. Extra bonus is that when I am decorating, because the compressor is on the shelf, it doesn't take up my counter/work space.

My problem is major disorganization - I'm lucky to have any counter space right now. And no time to do the major overhaul that my workspace needs.

FrostFlower Sugar Arts posted:

Also for using mesh stencils Evil Cake Genius recommends:  Stencil this pattern with thinned Royal Icing, or any Metallic Powder mixed with Vodka, then thickened with Clear Piping Gel to keep it's beautiful sheen! 

http://evilcakegenius.com/inde...ge-mesh-stencil.html

Ooh, I like that latter idea with the piping gel. Will have to try it.

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