Best recipe for gingerbread houses?

Every year I make houses for my own kids and my nephews (ages 3-20!) and we spend an afternoon decorating houses. I have a gingerbread cookie recipe I love for making cookies which is what I have always used for my houses, but it does spread more than I like for building construction.  It occurred to me that since we don't eat our houses, I don't actually care what the cookie tastes like, just how it cooks up. Does anyone have a recipe they are willing to share for gingerbread with very minimal spread?  Thanks in advance. 
Liv

(I couldn't decide if this post belonged here or in the recipe section, so apologies if it needs to be moved.)
Original Post
Originally Posted by 54mama:
Every year I make houses for my own kids and my nephews (ages 3-20!) and we spend an afternoon decorating houses. I have a gingerbread cookie recipe I love for making cookies which is what I have always used for my houses, but it does spread more than I like for building construction.  It occurred to me that since we don't eat our houses, I don't actually care what the cookie tastes like, just how it cooks up. Does anyone have a recipe they are willing to share for gingerbread with very minimal spread?  Thanks in advance. 
Liv

(I couldn't decide if this post belonged here or in the recipe section, so apologies if it needs to be moved.)

I betcha Tunde has a good one in her books: http://cookieconnection.juliau...-from-tunde-dugantsi

 

I also have a construction-grade gingerbread in my book Ultimate Cookies, and also on my app. Even my non-construction-grade gingerbread holds up very well, especially if you thinly coat the back of the panels with royal icing. Link to my books/app: https://www.papertrell.com/app...=37&platformid=3

For a completely inedible--but wonderfully smelling--"gingerbread" house that can be kept for years, you could try a sachet dough to make the building parts. (That would be equal parts of applesauce and ground cinnamon mixed together to form a pliable dough, which is then rolled, cut into shapes and either air-dried for two or three days or baked for a couple of hours in a very slow oven--200 degrees F.--before being assembled into houses.) This dough dries very hard and is often used to make tree ornaments or sachets. I made ornaments and closet sachets for gifts with my daughter with this recipe many years ago when she was a little girl, and I think it would work great for houses, too!

This is the recipe I used for years to make houses and trains, etc.  It has very good flavor.  The pieces are cut after the gingerbread is baked so there are some scraps and my family enjoys them.  It is not strong enough for large structures.

 

Gingerbread House Recipe

2 ¾ cups    Flour

½ teas       Salt

1 teas        Ginger

2/3 cup      Molasses

1/3 cup      Brown Sugar (packed)

1               Egg

3 teas        Baking Powder

1 teas        Cinnamon

1/8 teas     Ground Cloves

½ cup         Vegetable Oil

Mix all ingredients together in bowl.  Roll dough on oiled piece of foil.  Place on cookie sheet and bake at 300 F for 20 to 30 minutes.  Place patterns on hot bread and cut immediately.  Lift out carefully and cool on rack.  The gingerbread should be very hard when cool.  If necessary pieces can be placed back on cookie sheet and baked for 5 to 10 minutes longer.  The roof sections will break if dough is not thoroughly baked.

As my gingerbread structures have become larger, this is the recipe I use most often.  It is very hard, doesn't taste great and may break your teeth.  My family is always disappointed when I use it because there are no scraps - but they couldn't eat them anyway.

 

Another Stiff and Strong Gingerbread Dough

1 cup           Margarine (do not use butter)

1 ½ cups      Corn Syrup

1 ¼ cups      Brown Sugar (packed)

6 ¾ cups      Flour

1 Tbsp         Cinnamon

1 ½ teas       Ginger

½ teas          Salt

Melt the corn syrup, sugar and margarine together and then mix into the stirred together dry ingredients.   Divide into portions, wrap in plastic and chill until firm.   Roll out and cut pieces before baking.  This dough is stiff and if too hard to roll out, it can be softened by microwaving for a few seconds. Bake at 350 for 15 to 30 minutes as needed.  Note: this is a very light colored dough.  I use dark brown sugar and dark corn syrup and it still is a lot lighter than the recipe I posted above.

Originally Posted by Rocking Horse Sugar Decor:

As my gingerbread structures have become larger, this is the recipe I use most often.  It is very hard, doesn't taste great and may break your teeth.  My family is always disappointed when I use it because there are no scraps - but they couldn't eat them anyway.

 

Another Stiff and Strong Gingerbread Dough

1 cup           Margarine (do not use butter)

1 ½ cups      Corn Syrup

1 ¼ cups      Brown Sugar (packed)

6 ¾ cups      Flour

1 Tbsp         Cinnamon

1 ½ teas       Ginger

½ teas          Salt

Melt the corn syrup, sugar and margarine together and then mix into the stirred together dry ingredients.   Divide into portions, wrap in plastic and chill until firm.   Roll out and cut pieces before baking.  This dough is stiff and if too hard to roll out, it can be softened by microwaving for a few seconds. Bake at 350 for 15 to 30 minutes as needed.  Note: this is a very light colored dough.  I use dark brown sugar and dark corn syrup and it still is a lot lighter than the recipe I posted above.

I would love to try this recipe for sure!

Add Reply

×
×
×
×