Drying Cookies in the Oven

I don't own a food dehydrator. So after doing some research online I learned that I could put them in the oven, in the lowest temperature setting (In my oven, I select warm setting and the lowest it goes is 100F) for about 15 minutes. Better if you have a convection oven so you could have the fan going. I have only done this once and I liked the result. I didn't notice any deference in the taste of the cookies either. Has anyone else done this? if so, what are your thoughts on this?  

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I'll have to try that next time...I couldn't even use the dehydrator last night because my cookies are too thick! I make thick shortbread cookies and they were just slightly thicker than each tray. I will have to try them in my oven next time I have a chance to play around with cookies...I do have a convection oven and my lowest setting is also 100 degrees. Thanks for the tip and I look forward to hearing about others experience in doing this also.
 
Originally Posted by Sugar Pearls Cakes and Bakes:

I don't own a food dehydrator. So after doing some research online I learned that I could put them in the oven, in the lowest temperature setting (In my oven, I select warm setting and the lowest it goes is 100F) for about 15 minutes. Better if you have a convection oven so you could have the fan going. I have only done this once and I liked the result. I didn't notice any deference in the taste of the cookies either. Has anyone else done this? if so, what are your thoughts on this?  

I used to dry in my ovens, but my minimum setting is 150F, which is too high and hard to control - even if I turn it on for a while and turn it off and then set the cookies in. At 150F, small areas on cookies can quickly over-expand and crack. The icing can even lift off. Typically running a convection oven (with fan running) runs about 25F hotter than a conventional oven - so beware of that route especially.

 

All said, I MUCH prefer drying in a dehydrator. It's so much easier to control, very rarely do I worry about overheating the icing, and if I get distracted and the cookies stay in longer than 15-20 minutes, there's never been a problem.

 

But if your oven is well regulated to run at lower temps (95-105F), then it could be just wonderful. That's the temp at which I run my dehydrator.

 

Thank you, Julia M. Usher for you input on this subject. I have only done it once, so it is good to hear other people's experience with it. I'm a hobby decorator. I can't afford to get a dehydrator and justify my purchase to my husband   even though I would love to own one, so that is why I thought of giving this idea a try.  

My oven has a button called "convect convert" which lowers the temp by 25 degrees. Anyway, I appreciate all of the input and look forward to trying it out in the future.
 
Originally Posted by Julia M. Usher:

I used to dry in my ovens, but my minimum setting is 150F, which is too high and hard to control - even if I turn it on for a while and turn it off and then set the cookies in. At 150F, small areas on cookies can quickly over-expand and crack. The icing can even lift off. Typically running a convection oven (with fan running) runs about 25F hotter than a conventional oven - so beware of that route especially.

 

All said, I MUCH prefer drying in a dehydrator. It's so much easier to control, very rarely do I worry about overheating the icing, and if I get distracted and the cookies stay in longer than 15-20 minutes, there's never been a problem.

 

But if your oven is well regulated to run at lower temps (95-105F), then it could be just wonderful. That's the temp at which I run my dehydrator.

 

I have been out of town and just saw this.  Just a word of warning to really watch the heat if you put them in the oven. I did that once in a 'cookie emergency' and got butter bleed.

 

I am with Julia on the dehydrator and have never had a problem with that. Another way that I have dried them is to place them in front of a fan blowing horizontally, but you cannot have high humidity, which sounds to be an issue.  When I have done that, I have placed them in a room with good a.c. or with a dehumidifier.  

I just saw this post.

 

I live in a very humid place (Panama City, Panama = tropical weather, average humidity 80+% all year round) so the only way to dry my gumpaste figures is to put them in the oven with the light on. I don't own a dehydrator so I use this same method to dry my cookies and it works for me.

 

 

I started out using my oven on a very low temperature.  I only leave the cookies in the oven for about 25 minutes so they are touch dry but not dry enough to package.  If I leave them in too long or let the temperature get too high I experience butter seepage.  I have a dehydrator but I have left cookies in there for an hour and come back to find the butter has seeped, even on the lowest temperature so I am a bit cautious now!

Originally Posted by Cookie Craters:

I have a rather large microwave. I have sat a platter of cookies inside to dry for a few hours. They did dry but had a strange "rippling" look to the icing. but they did dry faster

If set too close to fan/blower on anything, the icing will ripple.

I have a gas oven and the lowest temp is about 150 as Julia's oven. I have read where others suggest to use the oven light and that puts off enough heat to dry the cookies, but mine does not have a light. I have never had success with the oven drying method. I got cookies where the icing ran off the cookie! Butter bleed. as someone else mentioned before, was also a problem.

Sometime I find my house is too cold and the cookies do not dry, even over night, in the winter. My house is really old and poorly insulated. I started last year by placing a heater near the cookies, but in front of my fan. The fan blows the hot air over the cookies and this works like a charm! I have found that I cannot have the heater too high or too close as the same problems occur as with the oven method. I have also found that the colors will bleed if the heater is too high or too close. This would not be good for the summer, as it heats up the entire room! I don't get to procrastinate in the summer, as much.

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