Which Do You Prefer, Wafer Paper or Frosting Sheets?

I find images or patterns in various places online, and sometimes design my own graphics in Photoshop. But be sure to heed copyright laws - it's best not to use others' images without permission or purchasing licenses (i.e., for clip art), especially if you're selling the cookies. 

Well, I find the icing sheets are much easier and faster to work with; just print, peel and stick to wet icing. Wafer paper is kind of a pain; wait for the cookie to dry, cut out pattern and paint with corn syrup and try not to get the corn syrup all over the place. Although when it comes to taste, I would rather eat a cookie with wafer paper than icing circles. Now, I may be doing this all wrong so feel free to comment

 

 

I generally agree with you, Bosco, though I don't usually put frosting sheets on wet icing topcoats either, though it sticks better to them (than wafer paper does) - it's just too messy for me. I always wait until the icing dries to get more exact placement or put the frosting sheets on naked cookies. Wafer paper won't stick to naked cookies, but icing sheets will. Another difference between the two! Though I may have mentioned it already!

I had a big issue trying to get the edges to lay flat with the wafer paper, no issue at all with the icing sheets- though I should say, I put them both down on wet icing.

The company I bought the wafer sheets said you could bake it directly with a light colored cookie- just adhere with egg white, I think.  Didn't try that since I needed a very white background.

I am struggling with this question right now and that's why I joined joined this forum....looking for opinions.  I have an order for 2 dozen cookies for 4th of July and half of them are graphics (vintage post cards) and half of them will be photographs.  I did a test today using frosting sheets from kopycake and they worked well with the graphics.   And I understand that the frosting sheets will also be better with photos.   I just ordered some wafer sheets and want to test those out as well. I am most interested in the consistency and taste with the cookie as well as appearance.  I know I can make them LOOK good, but I want them to taste and feel good in the mouth as well.

Hi, Donna! Personally, I much prefer wafer paper from a texture and flavor standpoint - it's flavorless, but it tends to be thinner and more delicate certainly than Kopykake frosting sheets, which can be thick and gummy. So I find wafer paper dissolves more rapidly on the tongue with less interference with cookie texture.

 

But frosting sheets (most brands anyway) are more opaque, so less of the underlying cookie will show through them, and the application also looks more "even."

 

I hope this helps a bit.

I have only used kopykake frosting sheets, which is only a handful of times mind you,and my question is about printing.  I seem to have trouble getting "true" colors especially red!  I have tried changing the settings with the computer and it always is more brownish red than a true red.  Customers were always happy but still bugs me so I don't promote that we do the images. I also put them on a dried cookie with karo or piping gel.

NJ, I have the same trouble with both papers. It's a printer color calibration issue. All printers are color-calibrated differently, so this compounds the problem too. I usually have to do multiple color adjustments of the image within Photoshop (or some other photo-editing software) in order to get it to print exactly as I want it. It's a trial and error process for me, so I always have some extra frosting sheets/wafer paper on hand.

Originally Posted by Julia M. Usher:

NJ, I have the same trouble with both papers. It's a printer color calibration issue. All printers are color-calibrated differently, so this compounds the problem too. I usually have to do multiple color adjustments of the image within Photoshop (or some other photo-editing software) in order to get it to print exactly as I want it. It's a trial and error process for me, so I always have some extra frosting sheets/wafer paper on hand.

I will have to work more with the photoshop.  I have some this week and of course they will have a red logo:/ thanks!

I prefer using icing (frosting) sheets.
I have a Canon MG5320 and it prints the colors perfectly. I use basic Microsoft Publisher to snag photos (being mindful of copyrights) or just lay out photos. I do find many public domain photos when searching.
I like the brilliance of the icing sheet. I place my images directly onto wet flavored royal icing. The photos/ images dry as colorful as printed.
I have wafer paper but I have not used it at all.
After reading comments I will try it again using piping gel.
Great discussion.

Davinci !

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Okay,  I can now say, without a doubt, I prefer wafer. 

 

I did 2 dozen image cookies this weekend. Part were graphics and part were photos. I used wafer paper for the graphic illustrations and frosting sheets for the photos.  I applied both to wet icing. 

 

My cookies were not real smooth, unfortunately...I tried a new cookie recipe and it didn't go so well....anyway, so that could also  have been a factor...but the wafer paper laid down nicely and gave a great appearance.  The frosting sheets turned out all bubbly and I needed to redo 8 out of the 12 photos. (Grrrr. There goes the profit on this job!)

 

Still, the photos just don't look good on the wafer paper.  So I just scraped the icing off, and reflooded 8 cookies, and am letting them dry smooth this time, and then I'll apply the frosting sheets, which I'm printing right now.  (By the way, that tip of putting them in the freezer to get a nice release works!)

 

  And, here's also a tip on the wafer paper. People comment on the edges curling.  While I was flooding the cookie I smeared (with a basting brush) a mixture of icing and corn syrup on a piece of wax paper and put the wafer image in it to "soak"  (careful not to get it on the front.)  I didn't have any trouble at all with curling edges. 

 

Also, I did a taste/texture test.  I think I actually like the texture and taste of the wafer paper better as well.

Thank you! I found that to be true as well!
 
Originally Posted by Julia M. Usher:

Hi, Donna! Personally, I much prefer wafer paper from a texture and flavor standpoint - it's flavorless, but it tends to be thinner and more delicate certainly than Kopykake frosting sheets, which can be thick and gummy. So I find wafer paper dissolves more rapidly on the tongue with less interference with cookie texture.

 

But frosting sheets (most brands anyway) are more opaque, so less of the underlying cookie will show through them, and the application also looks more "even."

 

I hope this helps a bit.

Originally Posted by Donna The Frosting Fairy:

 

  And, here's also a tip on the wafer paper. People comment on the edges curling.  While I was flooding the cookie I smeared (with a basting brush) a mixture of icing and corn syrup on a piece of wax paper and put the wafer image in it to "soak"  (careful not to get it on the front.)  I didn't have any trouble at all with curling edges. 

 

 

How did you transfer the "prepped" wafer paper from the "coated" wax paper to the cookie? 

Can anyone recommend someone (an Etsy business, perhaps) who can print custom frosting sheet images for me?  I read good things here about The Cookie Pixie's shop on Etsy but it appears that she only prints on wafer paper. I have an order of 200 cookies to do but it still doesn't seem worth investing in a printer and edible inks since I rarely get requests for these kinds of edible images. Thanks in advance for your help!

Sugar Pixie Sweets - I am going to put your question in a new thread since it is a pretty different topic and is likely to get missed here. Will post the link here once it is set up. In the future, if you've got a new question, it's best just to start a new question if you don't already see the same one on the site. Let me know if you need any tips for doing this.

Ysabella's Treats - just saw your question about spraying frosting sheets. I find that if I just put them back in their re-sealable packages (that they come in), they stay flexible for a VERY long time. But I suppose if you needed to (the papers got very brittle from overexposure to air), you could mist with water or a mixture of water and vodka to avoid over-wetting the paper and pitting/dissolving it.

Originally Posted by Debbi Hook - The SPI Flip Flop Foodie:
Originally Posted by Donna The Frosting Fairy:

 

  And, here's also a tip on the wafer paper. People comment on the edges curling.  While I was flooding the cookie I smeared (with a basting brush) a mixture of icing and corn syrup on a piece of wax paper and put the wafer image in it to "soak"  (careful not to get it on the front.)  I didn't have any trouble at all with curling edges. 

 

 

How did you transfer the "prepped" wafer paper from the "coated" wax paper to the cookie? 

I just saw this so I am sorry for the tardy reply.  I simply am able to pick the rice paper up and place it on the cookie.  They don't get real fragile.

 

Originally Posted by Donna The Frosting Fairy:
Originally Posted by Debbi Hook - The SPI Flip Flop Foodie:
Originally Posted by Donna The Frosting Fairy:

 

  And, here's also a tip on the wafer paper. People comment on the edges curling.  While I was flooding the cookie I smeared (with a basting brush) a mixture of icing and corn syrup on a piece of wax paper and put the wafer image in it to "soak"  (careful not to get it on the front.)  I didn't have any trouble at all with curling edges. 

 

 

How did you transfer the "prepped" wafer paper from the "coated" wax paper to the cookie? 

I just saw this so I am sorry for the tardy reply.  I simply am able to pick the rice paper up and place it on the cookie.  They don't get real fragile.

 


Thanks Donna - I actually did try it your way, but had a lot of trouble picking it up without getting "stuff" on the front.  I need a youtube to see how you do it!  Obviously I wasn't doing something right!  I appreciate the response.

Well, I thought I knew what I preferred. I had it in my head that wafer paper was the thick sheet that I sometimes see on cakes that is like eating a sheet of paper. Maybe that is rice paper? From what I am reading, wafer paper is a better choice in some ways. I have had success with Kopykake frosting sheets. Does wafer paper also come in 3" circles? I wouldn't want to cut circles to apply to cookies. 

Edible Canvas Creations - the number/qty/types of edible papers can be mind-boggling. I tried to demystify some of the differences/similarities in an Edible Papers 101 video that I just released to YouTube (below). In it, I talk about the different compositions and handling characteristics of wafer paper and frosting sheets, and the range of handling characteristics that you're likely to see even within frosting sheets. "Wafer paper," or at least the only type I've ever used, is made with potato not rice starch, whereas the starch in frosting sheets is usually either corn or tapioca. Frosting sheets - as a result of their composition - are more pliable and often, but not always, more opaque and heavy, but there are some pretty flimsy frosting sheets out there too. Anyway, I don't claim to do an exhaustive treatment of all edible papers in this video (I'm sure I've missed some), but it covers 90% of the terrain with which I'm familiar. Maybe it will help clarify some of the differences: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j74HlQ9ab5c

Also, wrt finding pre-cut wafer paper: you can find it pre-cut in circles but I haven't found it in this form in many other places than Queen or Tarts (and her rounds are only 2  to 2 1/2 inches wide, if not smaller); it usually comes in 8 x 10-inch or so sheets that you can cut to whatever size and shape you want. When I want perfect circles, I rely on craft paper punches - goes much faster and the look perfect.

 

Here's a Queen of Tarts link, as an example; they have some great vintage florals: https://www.etsy.com/listing/160982522/vintage-shabby-chic-roses-edible-image?ref=sr_gallery_8&ga_search_query=wafer+paper&ga_order=most_relevant&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_ship_to=US&ga_search_type=all&ga_facet=wafer+paper

 

Though I think Fancy Flours has a broader year-round selection. 

Originally Posted by The Cookie Princess (Diana):

I just bought my first edible printer. I think it came with wafer paper, not sure. Where do you get your pictures to print? Any special sites?

If you don't mind sharing...where did you get the printer from? Thanking you in advance.

Originally Posted by MsInes:
Originally Posted by The Cookie Princess (Diana):

I just bought my first edible printer. I think it came with wafer paper, not sure. Where do you get your pictures to print? Any special sites?

If you don't mind sharing...where did you get the printer from? Thanking you in advance.

There's an entire forum on edible printers - which and where to buy - here: http://cookieconnection.juliau...printers-preferences

I like the wafer paper and I apply them to my cookies which I have covered with a thin layer of fondant. Apply the layer of fondant, let it set overnight, brush very lightly with corn syrup, apply the wafer paper, turn the cookie upside down on to parchment paper to dry flat for at least 30 minutes.  Then I use royal icing to make a pretty shell border.  Perfect every time.

Originally Posted by AINUL OON:

BakerBabe26-Wished to see how this works(video/youtube)..Wafer paper is still new here. so would like to try out new ideas for cookie deco..

I have a video on YouTube about the difference between the various types of paper; and another one on how to make wafer paper flowers. If you want to check them out, here's the link to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/JuliaMUsher

Originally Posted by Nesreen Dabain:

Ladies,

I want to order wafer paper and do some work at home and try to start my own tiny business so do I need to be aware of the kind or thickness or any other details about wafer paper? I read all your notes and replies above.

Thanks in advance

You should experiment with various brands if you're planning to print your own. Some are more brittle than others; there are also new flavored wafer papers that actually taste halfway decent. But the sources I use are retail suppliers; you probably would want to purchase wholesale.

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