Christmas Platter by Kanch J
Practice Bakes Perfect Challenge #31: Wet-on-Wet

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Kanch J posted:

Practicing one technique at a time can help to learn a lot about it! 

What were some of the key things you learned this time? Please share, as these challenges are as much about the learning experience as anything else. Thanks!

Julia M. Usher posted:
Kanch J posted:

Practicing one technique at a time can help to learn a lot about it! 

What were some of the key things you learned this time? Please share, as these challenges are as much about the learning experience as anything else. Thanks!

Thank you @Julia M. Usher for your kind appreciation.

Experts may find these in common but for new bees it is a new learning experience.

  1. In cool weather it is difficult to do wet-on-wet technique because RI dries up faster. In hot weather it is easy to work with RI as it is not dries up quickly but due to the extra time required for drying, dark colours get blurred easily.
  2. For me it was not that successful this technique on round shaped 3D cookies. Tried one side at a time but still failed.

 

Hope can do better next time.

I’d like to know few things from you experts.

Is there a special way to use this technique on 3D cookies?

How can I get sharp edges when using dark colours?

Thank you!❤️

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Kanch J posted:
Julia M. Usher posted:
Kanch J posted:

Practicing one technique at a time can help to learn a lot about it! 

What were some of the key things you learned this time? Please share, as these challenges are as much about the learning experience as anything else. Thanks!

Thank you @Julia M. Usher for your kind appreciation.

Experts may find these in common but for new bees it is a new learning experience.

  1. In cool weather it is difficult to do wet-on-wet technique because RI dries up faster. In hot weather it is easy to work with RI as it is not dries up quickly but due to the extra time required for drying, dark colours get blurred easily.
  2. For me it was not that successful this technique on round shaped 3D cookies. Tried one side at a time but still failed.

 

Hope can do better next time.

I’d like to know few things from you experts.

Is there a special way to use this technique on 3D cookies?

How can I get sharp edges when using dark colours?

Thank you!❤️

I've only used this technique a few times on 3-D cookies (curved surfaces); it's more of a challenge to get controlled wet-on-wet patterns on a curved surface, because the icing wants to drip off. But I've managed to get decent results on small, gently curved surfaces (as in the small diamonds on my marbled Christmas ornament cookie), or by locating the wet-on-wet part closer to the top of the curved cookie and further from the sloping sides (as in the lady bug cookies in my book Ultimate Cookies, where her dots were concentrated around the top of the dome/her body). Of course, you could marble a bowl of icing and dip a curved cookie in it, but that would result in a more free-form effect - which could be quite cool.

For sharp, dark colors, stiffen up the top darker color a bit more, so it spreads less (and later bleeds less) into the underlying, lighter icing.

Julia M. Usher posted:
Kanch J posted:
Julia M. Usher posted:
Kanch J posted:

Practicing one technique at a time can help to learn a lot about it! 

What were some of the key things you learned this time? Please share, as these challenges are as much about the learning experience as anything else. Thanks!

Thank you @Julia M. Usher for your kind appreciation.

Experts may find these in common but for new bees it is a new learning experience.

  1. In cool weather it is difficult to do wet-on-wet technique because RI dries up faster. In hot weather it is easy to work with RI as it is not dries up quickly but due to the extra time required for drying, dark colours get blurred easily.
  2. For me it was not that successful this technique on round shaped 3D cookies. Tried one side at a time but still failed.

 

Hope can do better next time.

I’d like to know few things from you experts.

Is there a special way to use this technique on 3D cookies?

How can I get sharp edges when using dark colours?

Thank you!❤️

I've only used this technique a few times on 3-D cookies (curved surfaces); it's more of a challenge to get controlled wet-on-wet patterns on a curved surface, because the icing wants to drip off. But I've managed to get decent results on small, gently curved surfaces (as in the small diamonds on my marbled Christmas ornament cookie), or by locating the wet-on-wet part closer to the top of the curved cookie and further from the sloping sides (as in the lady bug cookies in my book Ultimate Cookies, where her dots were concentrated around the top of the dome/her body). Of course, you could marble a bowl of icing and dip a curved cookie in it, but that would result in a more free-form effect - which could be quite cool.

For sharp, dark colors, stiffen up the top darker color a bit more, so it spreads less (and later bleeds less) into the underlying, lighter icing.

Thank you so much for lengthy explaining. I'll apply to future work and let you know the success. 

Gorgeous set! I love the combination of wet-on-wet techniques that you used. I think your pine cones, evergreens and poinsettias are stand-outs, and those birdies are wonderful! Clearly, you are feeling more and more comfortable using the wet-on-wet technique. This is a great set!

Bakerloo Station posted:

Gorgeous set! I love the combination of wet-on-wet techniques that you used. I think your pine cones, evergreens and poinsettias are stand-outs, and those birdies are wonderful! Clearly, you are feeling more and more comfortable using the wet-on-wet technique. This is a great set!

Thank you for your kind words @Bakerloo Station! ❤ 

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